Do I have grounds to sue regarding an injury that I suffered in the home that I rent?

Question Details: I have lived in a rental home for 4 years now. We were told upon moving in that the hardwood floors were made of poplar and were an excellent grade of flooring. After 2 years of living here, my left foot became incredibly painful and I couldn't walk on it. Over time with X-ray and a MRI I find out that I have a broken bone, tendonitis and a shredded tendon. After being in a walking boot with no success, I ended up having surgery. The whole ordeal with all the recovery ended up being over a year while I was not able to work or contribute to my family. Now in the last couple weeks, my right foot has started to exhibit the same beginning signs of the identical symptoms of my left foot. We had spoken to our landlords about fixing a few items around the house and they sent out the gentleman who works for them on all their buildings to access what was needed to be done around the home. We discussed problems that we had with the floor, including parts of the floor falling through to the cellar, gaps between the boards becoming so wide with pieces of wood cracking off and places in the floor feeling like it's starting to give way. He informed us that the flooring is just a very cheap subflooring made with wood, something similar to pine, and wasn't made for people to be walking and living on. That this is supposed to be the floor under hardwood or carpet. We were extremely upset to find out all this pain and misery I have suffered all because of cheap flooring that was never disclosed to us. We mentioned to the landlords that we know about the flooring and all my injuries were due to the door. They said nothing to us and haven't said anything since. They haven't asked about my new injuries or what the doctor has said. We are looking for a new home to rent and I'm going back to seeing an orthopedic dr. Is there anything that can be done? Should they have disclosed to us about the floor?

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