Can I recover my equipment investment plus interest?

Question Details: I entered a verbal partnership with a local business owner almost 2 years ago to bring coffee to her specialty food store. I drafted a partnership agreement that we were supposed to collaborate over and edit but this never happened. My responsibility was just the coffee, although I did many other things around the shop including running it several times by myself and even installing a hand-washing sink in the basement. I invested my personal money into the coffee making equipment and first several months inventory as a gesture of good-will. I also agreed to have my share of the coffee profits reinvested into the business after my investment was paid-off. I separated from the business 10 months ago because my wife and I had a baby about 5 months earlier. I travel exactly half the year for my full-time job and could no longer justify spending my precious time-off at the store, away from my son. The store's owner agreed with this and also stated that she wanted to keep the coffee equipment. Upon my separation, I still had received 0 in repayment on my investment. I agreed to take groceries as part of repayment on this equipment. Currently, I have received just over $2000 in groceries and 0 in cash. I decided that I cannot take any more groceries as payment because the business owner has made no attempt at reimbursing me in cash. The equipment is still in use making the business money, except for a grinder that was broken after I separated. I have sent an email to the business owner stating that I want my money and am even willing to take it in payments. The response to my email has left me concerned that I will not receive a full reimbursement. What can I do to recover my investment?

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